class descriptions

Level 1

This class is designed to welcome and support those new to yoga and to offer a safe community to continue a regular yoga practice in a non-competitive environment. Learn basic yoga poses, breathing and meditation techniques to improve strength, flexibility, endurance, balance, focus and relaxation. Let the instructor know if you have any physical limitations or questions, so they can help you to make your yoga experience more comfortable.

op ^

All Levels

For ongoing students that would like to combine both the Level 1 and Level 2 class experience. Students will be offered ways to work with strengthening, flexibility, endurance, balance, focus and relaxation through asana, pranayama, chanting and meditation at a level appropriate for the students in class. Students are encouraged to honor their own abilities and adapt postures. The instructor will offer variations for Level 2 and challenging postures. Let the instructor know if you have any physical limitations or questions, so they can help you to make your yoga experience more comfortable.
 ^

Welcome area

Level 1+

For ongoing students with three or more months of yoga experience and those students that are ready to delve deeper into the asana (postures), pranayama (breathing), and meditation techniques related to yoga. Students will improve their knowledge of introductory and intermediate postures. Let the instructor know if you have any physical limitations or questions, so they can help you to make your yoga experience more comfortable. These classes are 1.25 hours in length.

Level 2

A challenging practice combining asana, pranayama, chanting and meditation: designed to deepen your yoga experience and inspire your body and mind. Asanas will be held longer. Deeper aspects of yoga will be introduced and applied. Let the instructor know if you have any physical limitations or questions, so they can help you to make your yoga experience more comfortable. Suggested prerequisite: six months of Level 1, Level 1+ or All Levels yoga class or previous experience. These classes are 1.5 hours in length.

Yoga for Pregnancy

Yoga for Pregnancy is a Level 1 class. Dynamic yet gentle yoga specifically designed to support women 6 weeks to term. Prenatal exercises & breath techniques are integrated to strengthen the childbearing muscles, increase flexibility and improve circulation and digestion.

Deep relaxation restores and balances the mental and emotional states, perfect preparation for labor and birth.

 

Free Meditation Sessions

Have a break on us. Come and start the weekend with a relaxed, friendly, and mindful outlook. We will have a short gentle warm up session to prepare the bodymindspirit for silence and tuneup. Meditation sessions will vary. We'll try to customize it to the group's needs. It could be guided with or without imagery. It could be totally silent or with sound or with read poetry. It could be focused on healing, or lovingkindness, or forgiveness, or compassion, or joy. It could be simply watching the breath and feeling the sensations in the body. But definitely, it will be a time to take a break from all thinking, and analysis, from guilt from the past and worry and fear of the future.

op ^

nia dance fitness

Nia is a sensory-based movement practice designed to increase strength and mobility while flowing joyfully between flexibility, precision, and play. Classes are danced barefoot and inspired by the dance arts, healing arts, and martial arts. With a focus on "The Body's Way", the joy is in the movement, and this is the secret of fitness: we stop exercising, start moving, and follow the pleasure principle. If it feels good, do it; if it doesn’t, stop! When we are mindful that our body's way is the right way for us, we can't go wrong! (As Oscar Wilde said, “Be yourself; everyone else is taken.”) Step into your own joyful journey with Nia, and positively shape the way you feel, look, think and live.

Classes are with Susan Creighton, who's Nia bio simply states, "I have been earning a Master's Degree in Life, and so far, Nia has been my favorite course. I hope to make it yours, too!"

More info at www.nianow.com or Susan's Nia Facebook page : www.facebook.com/SuBundance

Candlelight Restorative Yoga

In the glow of candlelight you can set aside the distractions and stresses of daily life and devote time to enhancing your sense of well being. In restorative yoga we do only the sweetest, gentlest poses we use lots of props such as blankets, bolsters, pillows and eye bags to support the body and allow it to relax and open up as we stay for many minutes in each pose.

Restorative yoga is the art of being rather than doing and is a wonderful complement to a more active yoga practice. It has been shown to lower blood pressure and heart rate, loosen joints, boost immune system function and reduce stress. You’ll leave feeling relaxed, refreshed and restored. All levels welcome.top ^

Stressed Out? How long term stress can impact your health and what you can do about it.
By Kathleen F. Miller

Do you feel like stress rules your life right now? Are you frequently sick or tired? Long term stress can truly change your body and damage your health. Steven Hall, MD is an eastside doctor with offices in Bellevue and Issaquah. His Integral Medicine practice combines both traditional and "alternative" medicine. He says, "we need to make a distinction between the effects of short-term and long-term stress. We are most concerned about long-term stress. As far as the body is concerned, this means stress that has been going on longer than three weeks. In addition to causing all of the bodily changes or physiological effects of the stress response, long-term stress induces changes in your body that:
• Suppress your immune system
• Set the hormone patterns that lead to metabolic obesity and diabetes
• Develop into hypertension and other cardiac risk factors
• Fatigue your adrenal glands

Your adrenal glands are your stress glands. They produce the majority of the hormones that are associated with the stress response. Once the adrenal glands start to fatigue from overwork, they can no longer release the stress hormones in the same ratios that the stress response is designed to need. And that imbalance tends to further exacerbate the bodily effects of stress."

Why does stress make us sick?

Dr. Hall observes, "modern life is filled with chronic situations that activate our physical stress response. Unruly traffic, hectic family commitments, over-scheduled days, and unrelenting responsibilities at work and at home are just a few of the pressures that most of us deal with on a daily basis.

When our body responds to these normal life experiences as if we were in mortal danger, our entire body goes out of balance. If we keep this up, over time we damage our bodies in real and significant ways, including being at increased risk for heart disease, cancer and other life threatening and debilitating diseases."

What can we do about stress?

You can learn to "restructure your relationship with stress" through a variety of means including a regular practice of yoga. The Mayo Clinic reports that "the ultimate goal of yoga is to reach complete peacefulness of body and mind, helping you relax and manage stress and anxiety." Dr. Hall also offers an upcoming class on long term stress management called Taming the Bear: Take the Bite Out of Stress. More information about the class and his practice can be found on his website: http://www.stevenmhallmd.com

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.